Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow

GLASGOW SCIENCE CENTRE


Glasgow Science Centre is made up of over 250 interactive displays ideal for entertaining, plus educating children. Thanks to this the Science Centre is one of the most popular family museums in Scotland. The main goal of the museum is to challenge and inspire through science. The museum itself is made up of three buildings: the Science Mall, Glasgow Tower and the IMAX theatre.

The Science Mall

The Science Mall is the largest of the 3 buildings, and hosts 3 floors of interactive exhibitions, plus the Science Show Theatre and the Glasgow Science Centre Planetarium. With the aid of one of the best star projectors in the world and advanced fibre optic technology, the Planetarium lights up the night sky with over 9000 twinkling stars. Study the incredible replicas of the star formations without the distraction of street lights. The planetarium in Glasgow is regarded as one of the best in the world.
The Science Mall is the place that you can sit down for refreshments in the museum’s café and purchase fun souvenirs in the shop.
 

The Glasgow Tower

The Glasgow Tower is the tallest fully rotating freestanding structure in the world, at 127 metres high. When open (it closes temporarily in high winds) it offers unrivalled panoramic views of the city. The tower is also home to a timeline tunnel which highlights the key history of Glasgow.
 

The IMAX theatre

The IMAX theatre is the largest of its kind in Scotland. With a digital 14,000 watt 6.1 surround sound system, 370 viewers can become part of the movie experience. Shows are available in both 2D and 3D.
 

Getting to the Glasgow Science Centre

Glasgow Science Centre is easily spotted by its unique structure, a crescent-shaped titanium dome. Located on the south bank of the River Clyde, next to the SSE Hydro, access is simple from the city centre. The Glasgow Science Museum is easy to reach on foot or by subway, train or car from the Radisson Blu Hotel in Glasgow. The hop on, hop off Glasgow Sightseeing bus also stops here. Why not combine with other Glasgow museums, such as the Riverside Museum?