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Hotels in Trondheim


From skiing to sailing on the fjord, there’s never a dull moment in breathtaking Trondheim! Stay in the city centre close to Nidaros Cathedral and the beautiful wooden buildings of Bakklandet at the Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, known for its classic quayside architecture. As the closest hotel to the airport, the luxury Radisson Blu Hotel, Trondheim Airport is a great choice when you’ve an early or late flight to catch.

Trondheim has a long and exciting history and was founded by Viking King Olav Tryggvason in 997. For 200 years it was the capital of Norway, and in 1152 the city became an Archbishopric. In the same year the country's first school, the Cathedral School, was also founded here. Trondheim developed rapidly to become a leading commercial centre for the area, a role it still retains today as the region's largest city. It has everything from special niche shops, chain stores and large shopping centres.

The city has changed its name many times. The oldest known name is Nidaros, which means the city by the mouth of the river Nid. It was in the late Middle Ages that Trondheim "home of the Trønder" became more common. During the Danish rule (1450-1814) the name was written "Trondhjem", but it was more commonly referred to as Byen or Staden. In 1930/31 it was heavily debated whether the city should be named Nidaros or Trondhjem. It all ended in a compromise; the name Trondheim was chosen. But even though Trondheim is the official name used, most residents still refer to the city as Trondhjem and themselves as 'Trondhjemmere'.

Trondheim is often referred to as the Technology Capital of Norway. NTNU, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and the research institute SINTEF merit the biggest credit for this. NTNU has a national responsibility for education and research within technology. 80% of the country's civil engineers are educated here and many former NTNU students currently hold important positions in business and industry. NTNU also focuses on areas such as energy and the environment, medicine, marine and maritime R & D, as well as IT and communications technology. NTNU has one of Norway's best student environments and the student community in Trondheim, called 'Samfundet,' also has three of Trondheim's best concert stages; every second year Norway's biggest cultural festival UKA is organised under the auspices of the student community. Student media in Trondheim 'Under Dusken','Student-TV' and 'Studentradion' are also partly run from student buildings and are an important part of the community's identity.

It is said that it rains diagonally in Trondheim. The climate is mild and damp, thanks to the city's location inside a mild climate zone and despite its proximity to the polar climate zone. It usually rains around 200 days a year in Trondheim, so an umbrella always comes in handy. Despite the climate here Trondheim is a stunning green city and on a sunny day there really is nowhere more beautiful.

Radisson Blu has two excellent hotels in Trondheim. Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel is located right in the city centre, within easy walking distance of most of Trondheim's attractions. Radisson Blu Hotel, Trondheim Airport is in close proximity to Værnes airport and therefore perfectly located when distance to the airport is important. Visit Trondheim and enjoy all that the city has to offer.

Trondheim boasts a wealth of shopping opportunities; niche shops lie alongside chain stores and several large shopping centres. The city centre is small and intimate with the Nid River and Trondheim fjord bordering it on all sides. The main shopping street in the city centre is Nordre gate. Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel is located right in the heart of Trondheim's shopping area.

Behind the hotel is Bakke Bru, which will take you to the exciting district of Bakklandet. This old wooden house village is one of Europe's most important and was threatened with demolition in the 1970s. Fortunately it was saved and is now a lively quarter containing everything from cafés and art galleries to private homes. Here you will find plenty of exciting art by local artists. Once you have explored Bakklandet, take a stroll across the beautiful old city bridge back to Trondheim city centre.

Trondheim is an oasis of small independent fashion and interiors shops. The selection of clothes shops is impressive and you will even find shops that will tailor clothes for you. These shops are not usually found in Nordre gate, but are close by. Many shops focus on recycling and Kamelones is one of these. Here every single garment is unique so you can be sure to find something that no one else is likely to wear at the same party.

Like any respectful city, Trondheim also has several shopping centres. Trondheim Torg, Mercursenteret and Byhaven in the centre are just some of them. Here you will find all you need in one place and stay dry whatever the weather. Across the Verfts bridge is Solsiden Shopping Centre. Trondheim also has several shopping malls outside the centre and if you have a car or want to take the bus, they are well worth a visit.

Once you are laden with shopping bags and your wallet feels a little lighter, return to the Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel for a well-earned rest before venturing out into Trondheim's culinary world.

A lovely way to explore Trondheim is by bike. Hire a city bike and explore the city. You can also try one of the world's first bike lifts, which will take you all the way up the steep Brobakken, almost up to Kristiansten Festning. Just imagine how much fun it would be to cycle back down the hill again.

Trondheim is probably best known for its impressive cathedral, Nidarosdomen. The cathedral was begun in 1070 and is still being restored. As one of Norway's most magnificent buildings, the cathedral stands in the centre of Trondheim and is the city's most popular meeting point. The cathedral is packed with beautiful artwork and stone sculptures, but little has survived since the Middle Ages. Next to the cathedral is Erkebispsgården, home to Norway's Royal Regalia; the king's crown and the crown jewels. Visit one of the city's most exciting museums and see the archaeological excavations, which discovered three coin workshops on top of each other.

Cycle onto Lerkendal Stadion, home to Rosenborg football club. Rosenborg is Norway's most successful football club over the last twenty years, so why not enjoy a guided tour of the legendary Lerkendal?

Trondheim offers many art galleries, where you can see and buy art - and a rich music scene. Visit rock and pop museum Rockheim at Brattørkaia and experience Norwegian popular music's "collective memory" - history, context and memorabilia from the 1950s onwards. Here you can experience live music, presentations and exciting installations that give you an insight into Norwegian music history.

The city also has many festivals to offer. The entire year is based around festivals, concerts and theatre performances. Few other cities have as many festivals as Trondheim. Both large and small Norwegian and international artistes make their way here every year. There's Pstereo,Trondheim's Chamber Music Festival, Kosmorama, Minimalen Short Film Festival, Nidaro's Blues Festival, the Trondheim Jazz Festival, the Trøndersk Food Festival and the Olav festival, to name but a few. In other words, there's a festival for every interest.

Once you have clocked up the miles on your bike, return it to its bike stand. New experiences await you.

Trondheim has many excellent restaurants and these are increasingly based on locally-sourced food. Trondheim is afterall in one of Norway's major food producing regions. At the Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel the day starts with a healthy breakfast, which you can eat as you look across the Nid river. Enjoy freshly baked bread and fresh fruit and let your batteries recharge before the day's activities. The hotel restaurant - Søttitre Bar & Restaurant - is one that values locally-sourced food, and its concept is the "taste of Trøndelag'. Most ingredients are sourced locally, even though the food has an international feel. This is a popular gourmet restaurant of exceptional standard.

In one of the quarters by the old city bridge (Gamle Bybro) is the seafood restaurant Havfruen, which serves first rate seafood dishes. The menu changes monthly in order to provide you with the best seasonal ingredients. Visit the restaurant and enjoy world-class fish and seafood.

"To rom og kjøkken" in Carl Johansgate serve wonderful food and wine based on local ingredients prepared in Mediterranean style. The owners are passionate about quality and this is evident in the warm welcome and throughout your meal. Be advised to book ahead.

As well as the restaurants for more special occasions, Trondheim also offers cosy cafés, such as Baklandet's Skydsstation. From quite unique premises, this peaceful, idyllic café serves delicious food and drinks in traditional surroundings. The café serves home-made food freshly prepared on the premises. Some say it serves Norway's best fish soup and nothing beats a cup of the café's home-made hot chocolate on a chilly autumn day. Here you can enjoy both food and drink as you look over Nidarosdomen. Skydsstationen is world famous and was voted Café of the Year by National Geographic in 2012. So you just have to try it, right?

As a student city, Trondheim has an impressive night life and even though many of the night clubs are mainly frequented by students, they are still fun to try. Dance the night away at Klubben, Bar Circus or Club 26. And when your legs tire, it's always lovely to return to the Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel and lay your head on the pillow until morning.